Restrictive practice types

There are three types of restrictive practices (in order of the level of intrusiveness on the adult).

1. Containment and seclusion

  1. Containment - an adult cannot physically leave the place where they receive disability services. This may include locking doors, windows or gates. It is not considered containment if an adult has a lack of road safety skills and a door is locked to prevent them wandering close to a road.
  2. Seclusion - an adult cannot physically leave a room or area where they receive disability services. This may include locking doors, windows or gates. The adult is placed on their own, at any time of the day or night.

2. Chemical, physical and mechanical restraint

  1. Chemical restraint - the use of medication to control the adult’s behaviour. This does not include using medication for treating a diagnosed mental illness or physical condition.
  2. Physical restraint - the use of any part of another person’s body to restrict the free movement of the adult with the aim of controlling the adult’s behaviour.
  3. Mechanical restraint - the use of a device to either restrict the free movement of an adult or to prevent or reduce self-injurious behaviour.

3. Restricting access to an object

Limiting the adult’s access to an object, for example a kitchen drawer with knives, at a place where the adult receives disability services. This can prevent the adult using the object to cause harm to themselves or others.